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Montessori Lessons, Ideas and More…

Take a Tour of Italy – Montessori K-6 Unit Study

The AMC Montessori Italy Unit Study has just been updated for 2012. Visit Montessori Italy Unit Study to access the links listed below.

These PreK and K-8 links will lead you to articles, hands-on activities and other exercises that are compatible with the Montessori classified reading cards, phonics, grammar, creative writing, science, social studies and other extensive lesson plans found in Montessori at Home, Modern Montessori at Home and Modern Montessori at Home II books.

Links for Learning the Italian Language

Beginning French Lessons (Use the Materials for Lesson Presentations in English, Spanish and Italian)
Beginning Italian – Learn the Parts of a House
Beginning Italian – Colors
Teaching Children Italian: Parts of the House
The Alphabet: Teaching Children Italian Part 2
Numbers: Teaching Children Italian Part 3
Parts of the Body: Teaching Children Italian
AMC Montessori Grammar Game (Customize to Present Grammar in Italian – Free Game Templates Included)
Download a Free Italian Song

Links to Italian Art, Art History and Renaissance Fashion

Art Projects for Elementary Students on Da Vinci Leonardo da Vinci Drawings
Art Appreciation for Preschool and Elementary Children
Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci
Hands On Michelangelo Projects
Italian Renaissance Costume Construction (for Older Children and Teens)
An Easy Italian Renaissance Gown
History of Italian Art
Italian Art & Italian Craft
Montessori Renaissance Art Presentations
Renaissance Art of Italy
Classroom Drawing and Painting Supplies for Your Art Prsentations

Links to Music of Italy

Oh How I Love Italy – Music, Art, Food Seasoned with History and Geography
Vivaldi’s Musical Activities and Lessons for The Four Season
Italian Music Terms
Music Unit Study (William Tell Overture Finale by Gioachino Rossini) Ages 5 – 7
Music Unit Study (William Tell Overture: Finale by Gioachino Rossini)Ages 8 – 10
ITALIA – Musical Instruments Museums in Italy
Montessori Renaissance Music Presentations
A Brief History of Italian Opera – Listen to the Audio

Geography and Social Studies Links

Free Blank Outline Map of Italy
Maps of Italy (for Classification and Matching Exercises)
Italy: Monuments Past and Present
Italy, Rome & Roman Culture Educational Posters
Italy Timeline
Rome – The Late Republic
Italy: History, Geography, Government and Culture
Great Italians in History
A History of Italy
History of the Italian Language
A Maria Montessori Worth Watching

Italian Recipes

Apple’s Manicotti (Watch as Apple leads children through the recipe process)
Sara’s Antipasto Salad Recipe
The Italian Chef
Easy Italian Recipes
Giada De Laurentiis Recipes

Let’s Write and Discuss

Italy Around the World
Roman Food- History for Kids!
Androcles and the Lion Fable
Androcles and the Lion Felt Board Story
WebQuest for Kids
Visiting Rome with Your Kids
Visiting Italy with Children
Write Your Own Books – For K – 3rd Grade(Part I) – Create a booklet about Italy)
Write Your Own Books – For K – 3rd Grade (Part II) – Create a booklet about Italy

To access this unit study please visit Montessori Unit Study

Enjoy!
Heidi Anne Spietz
http://www.amonco.org

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Montessori Springtime Nature and Science Activities

Spring is an excellent time to get the children in our lives interested in and excited about science and nature.

Last year we interviewed ornithologist Sanford R. Wilbur for some tips about how to start children out in the engrossing activity of birdwatching. You don’t need to spend a lot of money or have any previous “birding” experience in order to help kids with ornithological studies.  Mr. Wilbur makes it fun and easy with his suggestions. http://www.amonco.org/spring1/montessori_spring1.pdf

Dale Gausman from the North American Montessori Center gives more useful suggestions in his article, “Introducing a Bird Feeder”. http://www.amonco.org/spring4/montessori_spring4.pdf

Spring weather is often perfect for burning off some energy and getting some fresh air while kite flying.  It is a fun hands-on activity with great science and exercise opportunities. Check out our information and links in “Up, Up, and Away – The Art and Fun of Kite Flying”, as well as our seashell classification activities (another fun spring science project) here: http://www.amonco.org/spring4/montessori_spring4.pdf

Another classic outdoor activity for kids (and adults) is blowing soap bubbles. It’s an inexpensive, simple activity that teaches some interesting lessons about gravity, light waves, hydrogen bonding and other chemistry and physics concepts. It’s also an activity that is beautiful and entertaining.  Add a younger sibling or family dog to the scene, trying to catch the bubbles, and you really have some fun! For more ideas and some recipes for making your own bubble solution, visit these websites: http://www.exploratorium.edu/ronh/bubbles/bubbles.html and http://www.bubbleblowers.com/homemade.html

Indoors or out, photography can provide the basis of many engaging and educational hands-on activities, when you choose age-appropriate equipment.  Rae from Creative Process suggests some interesting photography projects in her “Picture-A-Day and Time Lapse Photography Idea”.  http://www.amonco.org/spring2/montessori_spring2.pdf

 

For a great round-up of nature-oriented educational activities, be sure to read the listing from Diana Nuack of Nature’s Workshop Plus, available here: http://www.amonco.org/spring8/montessori_spring8.pdf

Need more spring activity ideas? http://www.activities-for-kids.net/spring-activities-for-kids.html

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When the outdoor fun is finished, there are lots of ways to expand on what you learned.

John Grunder from Exploration Education has shared two great science experiments.  “I CAN’T TAKE THE PRESSURE!” teaches Bernoulli’s principle in a fun and easy way with common household items.  His “Needle-Proof Balloon” experiment teaches about molecular bonds. http://www.amonco.org/spring3/montessori_spring_3.pdf

It is useful and easy to reinforce science and nature themes through both fiction and non-fiction reading.  Frances Hodgson  Burnett’s “The Secret Garden” is an especially appropriate subject for spring reading, because the garden and the children both transform and “bloom” as the book proceeds.  For more outdoor-oriented fiction,  many of the titles suggested by Sara L. Ambarian for summer reading would also be good inspiration for spring nature science projects and exploration.  http://www.amonco.org/Classic.pdf  Find some fun spring poetry here: http://www.dltk-holidays.com/spring/poem/index.htm

Back in the house or classroom, why not try the map of the world project from Draw Your World’s Marie and Kim to help students process and understand scale and geography.  http://www.amonco.org/spring5/montessori_spring.5.pdf

Have fun this weekend, checking out these wonderful resources.

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Montessori Style Spring Kitchen and Garden Sciences

Basically everything we cook in the kitchen is an experiment –or potential lesson– in science. Even kitchen “failures”, such as burned or moldy foods, can provide interesting “teachable moments”, if you are in that mindset.  Food preparation is also an invaluable practical life skill for nurturing the bodies and souls of ourselves and those around us. The more children understand both the science and art of cooking, and the more comfortable and familiar they become with kitchen and garden activities, the better able they will be to master and enjoy this important part of daily life.

For some children, formal experiments may be more interesting that “regular” cooking.  For some fun study ideas about eggs, refer to Kathy O’Reilly’s “Exploring Eggs—Food Related Activities” here: http://www.amonco.org/spring8/montessori_spring8.pdf

Eggs are a very interesting and versatile food and science object.  Find more experiments using eggs below. http://www.hometrainingtools.com/kitchen-science-newsletter/a/1295/ http://www.sandiegozoo.org/education/science_eggs_float.html, http://www.homebaking.org/KitchenScience.pdf and http://www.twohelmets.com/2009/08/eggs-and-copper-bowls-kitchen-science.html

You can also have lots of fun and scientific learning with ice cubes.  The fine folks at Fun Felt share quite a few ideas here: http://www.amonco.org/spring2/montessori_spring2.pdf

Some students will find recipes more inspiring than experiments, often because of the incentive of eating the results. (I think most of us can understand that!)  If the children in your care are so inclined, try some of these fun recipes.  “Fresh Off the Cob Casserole” or “Hot Fudge Topping” from Larry at the Farm Country General Store. http://www.amonco.org/spring7/montessori_spring7.pdf  “Home-made Ice Cream in a Bag” from Ron at Intellitunes http://www.amonco.org/spring2/montessori_spring2.pdf and Nan Barchowsky’s “Yummy Peanut Butter Fudge” http://www.amonco.org/spring3/montessori_spring_3.pdf

Between activities, help children keep track of their cooking projects and practice their penmanship at the same time with Nan from Barchowsky’s Fluent Handwriting’s project idea, “Make Your Own Illustrated Favorite Foods and Recipes Notebook”. http://www.amonco.org/spring3/montessori_spring_3.pdf

Gardening can be a useful and enjoyable extension of both cooking and other kitchen sciences. Garden Artisans’ Catherine Hartridge offers many good ideas to help you get started gardening with children. http://www.amonco.org/spring4/montessori_spring4.pdf

Dale Gausman from North American Montessori Center also provides some additional neat insights on gardening with children in his article, “Spring Is Here – Planting a Flower Garden”. http://www.amonco.org/spring5/montessori_spring.5.pdf

If you don’t have a lot of outdoor space, you can still try some indoor gardening.  Look at Dale’s cute “Grass-Eggshell People” project. http://www.amonco.org/spring4/montessori_spring4.pdf

Perhaps the easiest indoor gardening of all is growing edible sprouts.  There is no soil or fertilizer to handle, and you need only very basic, inexpensive (or sometimes free) equipment. Sara L. Ambarian gives you the details you need to get started in her article, “Home-grown ‘Fast Food’ for Busy Families”.  http://www.amonco.org/spring1/montessori_spring1.pdf

Find more useful tips and ideas for gardening with children at these sites.

https://montessori21stcentury.wordpress.com/2011/03/21/spring-is-here-time-to-start-your-school-or-home-gardening

http://www.kidsgardening.org/

http://www.whitehutchinson.com/news/learnenews/2009_june/article103.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/gardening_with_children/

 

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Exploring Holidays and History

 

Spring brings many special holidays and historical events to enrich our homes and classrooms. Enjoy these resources to help your students understand and explore these interesting observances.

For a round-up of various links for January and February lesson plans and ideas, visit: http://www.amonco.org/jan_feb_celebrations.html   

Black History Month – February

Black History Month, observed in February since 1926, provides many interesting opportunities to explore history, culture and food.  The Creative Process can get you started with their “Celebrate Black History Month” page, linked here: http://www.amonco.org/spring8/montessori_spring8.pdf

You will find more information, resources and recipes in the links below.

http://www.lessonplanspage.com/blackhistorymonth-htm , http://seasonal.theteacherscorner.net/black-history-month , http://www.thinkfinity.org/?q=black-history-month , and http://www.soul-food-advisor.com/black_history_month.html

Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, February 12, 1809

There is no question that Abraham Lincoln is one of the most famous and most admired presidents of the United States.  Many states no longer observe his birthday as a separate holiday; but his life, accomplishments and assassination are at the heart of one of the most complex and pivotal eras of American history.  President Lincoln’s life and career make an excellent basis for unit studies. Explore these interesting websites for more information.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/abrahamlincoln , http://www.nps.gov/abli/index.htmhttp://www.civilwarhome.com/lincolnbio.htm , and http://www.primaryteachers.org/abraham_lincoln_unit.htm

George Washington’s birthday, February 22, 1732 (Presidents’ Day observed February 20, 2012)

Sara L. Ambarian helps us get to know the man who is called “the Father of our Country”, with information about George Washington in her article, “Celebrating the Personal Life of George Washington”. You’ll find additional educational links about our first president at the end of the article. http://www.amonco.org/spring8/montessori_spring8.pdf

For more presidential lesson ideas, read “It’s Time to Think Outside the Box and Kindle, Too!” from Literatureplace.com, with its suggestions for studying Thomas Jefferson. http://www.amonco.org/spring3/montessori_spring_3.pdf  You can also enhance your studies of government and politics with a batch of the famous, traditional and tasty Senate Bean Soup, from Dale and Rita at North American Montessori Center. http://www.amonco.org/spring4/montessori_spring4.pdf

St. Patrick’s Day, March 17

Visit these links for lesson and craft ideas for the “greenest” spring holiday! https://montessori21stcentury.wordpress.com/2008/02/13/st-patricks-day-crafts-origami-and-more  http://www.fastq.com/~jbpratt/education/sstudies/geog/stpatricks.html  and http://www.edhelper.com/st_patricks_day.htm  

Easter, April 8

Georgette Baker from Cantemos offers some fun projects for Easter and other spring holidays.  Check out her festive hat and easy tie-dye instructions. http://www.amonco.org/spring1/montessori_spring1.pdf  

For long-lasting Easter fun outdoors, Jan from Garden Artisans shares a cute Hippity Hoppity Bunny Topiary project here: http://www.amonco.org/spring2/montessori_spring2.pdf  

Bake up an interesting Italian tradition with Mary Ann Esposito’s Neopolitan Stuffed Easter Bread.  If desirable, you could make it easier, more economical and/or more kid-friendly by replacing the fancy imported meat and cheese with meat or cheese of your choice.  It might also be more kid-friendly if you dice the meat and cheese a little smaller than Ms. Esposito does in the tutorial.  The recipe is full of interesting Easter symbolism, and what child wouldn’t be fascinated (as Ms. Esposito was herself) by the whole raw eggs baked into the bread! http://www.ciaoitalia.com/seasons/20/2020/neapolitan-stuffed-easter-bread  

Find more Easter inspiration at the following sites.

http://www.preschooleducation.com/aeaster.shtml , http://www.bobsedulinks.com/easter.htm  and http://www.holidays.net/easter/index.htm

Cinco de Mayo, May 5

Cinco de Mayo is not, as sometimes assumed, Mexican Independence Day (a separate holiday which is celebrated on September 16). It marks the Battle of Puebla in which Mexican troops defeated French troops. Find out more at: http://www.mexonline.com/cinco-de-mayo.htm  

For introduction or reinforcement of Spanish language lessons, check out the offerings from Cantemos http://www.amonco.org/spring1/montessori_spring1.pdf  and Professor Toto http://www.amonco.org/spring6/montessori_spring6.pdf  

For Spanish-speaking students or those learning Spanish, check out our Unit Study Lesson Plan About Mexico in Spanish. https://montessori21stcentury.wordpress.com/2008/02/14/a-unit-study-lesson-plan-about-mexico-in-spanish

For more lesson ideas and some recipe ideas for Mexican food to make, check these interesting sites.  http://seasonal.theteacherscorner.net/cinco-de-mayo/ , http://recipesource.com/ethnic/americas/mexican /, and http://www.mexicanrecipes.org /

Mother’s Day , May 13

Parents and educators are always looking for ideas and resources for the popular holiday, Mother’s Day.  Dale Gausman from NAMC lists some books and ideas in his article, “Mother’s Day in the Montessori Classroom”. He also provides some lesson plan ideas for older students.  http://www.amonco.org/spring6/montessori_spring6.pdf

These websites provide some additional ideas for crafts and decorations.  http://www.mothersdaycentral.com/mothers-day-crafts/  and http://www.divinedinnerparty.com/mothers-day-ideas.html

Memorial Day, May 28

Memorial Day is a solemn, but potentially important holiday with which to acquaint children at age appropriate levels. NAMC’s Dale Gausman discusses the history of and Montessori perspective for teaching about Memorial Day in his “Montessori Curriculum Ideas for Memorial Day”. http://www.amonco.org/spring7/montessori_spring7.pdf

Find more information on the history of this day of remembrance, at: http://www.history.com/topics/memorial-day-history  and http://virtual-markets.net/vme/memorial/dvm_mem.html  

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For more seasonal and holiday observances for educators, visit: http://www.netposterworks.com/holidays/index.html  and http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays

For more about holidays, in a convenient monthly chronology, see Rae from The Creative Process’s “Monthly Observances and Notable Dates”. http://www.amonco.org/spring2/montessori_spring2.pdf

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