Montessori21stCentury’s Weblog

Montessori Lessons, Ideas and More…

Montessori February Community Service Projects 2016

Please note: If the links don’t come through, please visit http://www.amonco.org/montessoricommunityprojects.html

This year commit to do something fun yet really meaningful for those in your community who are sad and lonely. Become involved in a project and possibly enlist the help of other families and friends. First, call your local nursing home or children’s hospital and explain that you would like to bring handmade gifts to the patients. Find out the dos and don’ts of acceptable gift giving.

Now, get busy and go to work. 🙂 Visit the Kids Activities – Community Service Ideas website. Scroll down until you see Project Ideas. Decide whether you want to make a cooking, sewing or other type of craft project. One word of caution here. The first time we became involved in a community project, we got a little carried away by our enthusiasm and spent more than we wanted. Don’t make the same mistake. Meet with your other community project partners and agree that you will set a spending limit. To make the project enjoyable for everyone, be sure to also consider the age, ability, interest, and attention span of the children/teens involved in making the gifts.

Bargain hunting does take time but is well worth the effort. These trips are useful for children and teens as they learn about budgeting, units of measurement in cooking and how much yardage of material to buy.

Visit some craft, yardage and stationery stores in your area and explain what your group is doing and ask to see the discount and bins. Also inquire about possible discounts.

You can also cut costs by purchasing baking items at many discount grocery chains. Below, are some additional sites and recipes to consider for your cooking projects.

Although the service project mentioned in this posting is designed for the young, the elderly enjoy these projects as well. A 91-year-old member of our family recently created the Valentine bag pictured above. She continues to be housebound because of illness but is motivated to reach out and help others. She currently is making these organza Valentine bags to give to women in need.

We did some bargain shopping and found some good buys through eBay auctions. Among the best bargains were the satin rosettes and organza bags. By clipping coupons and waiting for sales, we were also able to purchase ribbon and other trimming at deeply discounted prices.

This year, we knew that it was mandatory that we stay within our budget. Again, we made some price comparisons and found some very inexpensive lots of lip balm, mini hand lotion, etc. These items will be inserted into the 30 completed organza Valentine bags and given as gifts.

May the love and compassion that you send out to others be returned to you.

Visit American Montessori Consulting and look under New and Notable for other holiday related lessons and unit studies.

Enjoy!
Heidi Anne Spietz
American Montessori Consulting
Celebrating 28 Years of Serving School and Home Educators
Montessori for the 21st Century
Leave a comment »

Sewing a Friendship Quilt

Activity Submitted by Dale Gausman of the

North American Montessori Center http://www.montessoritraining.net

Copyright 2015.  All Rights Reserved. Dale Gausman, NAMC

Material

Tray containing: darning needle and several straight pins in a pincushion; embroidery thread in assorted colors; fabric scissors; fabric paint; tacky craft glue; pencil or chalk. Basket containing: Pre-cut felt rectangles 9 x 12 inches (23 x 30 cm) in different colors, two per student; pre-cut fabric squares 3 x 3 inches (7.5 x 7.5 cm), four per student.

Presentation

  • Most Montessori teachers present this activity in Years 1 and 2. This activity can take place over several days. • In advance, send a note home asking parents to donate scraps of colorful fabric such as cotton to be used for the friendship quilt.
  • In advance, cut the donated fabric scraps with pinking shears (zigzag scissors) into 3-inch (7.5-cm) squares, enough for four per student.
  • In advance, place items on the tray and place the tray on a shelf. Place the felt rectangles and the fabric squares in a basket on the shelf next to the tray.

PART 1: GETTING READY

  • Announce that students will have an opportunity to make something beautiful using cloth and a needle and thread.
  • Go to the shelf and choose two felt rectangles and four fabric squares from the basket, place them on the tray, then bring the tray to the worktable or mat.
  • Explain the activity: The students will sew a colorful quilt, which is called a friendship quilt because a group of friends make it together.

PART 2: SEWING THE FRIENDSHIP QUILT

  • Take the felt rectangle from the tray and place it on the worktable, then choose one of the fabric squares and place it on one of the corners of the felt rectangle.
  • Remove two straight pins from the pincushion and hand them to you.
  • Demonstrate how to pin two sides of the fabric square securely to the felt rectangle, by placing the pins approximately 1/2 inch (1.25 cm) from the edges of the fabric square. Remove two more pins, then pin the other two sides of the fabric square to the felt.
  • Choose one color of embroidery thread, and with the scissors, cut off a piece of thread that is about 16 inches (40 cm) long.
  • Demonstrate how to tie a knot at the end of the thread, and thread the other end through the eye of the darning needle.
  • Demonstrate how to begin sewing around the edge of the small square, about 1/3 inch (.8 cm) from the edge. Pull the needle through one corner of the felt rectangle and fabric square, being sure the knot is on the underside of the felt.
  • Demonstrate how to make a running stitch by pulling the needle and thread up and down through the fabric in a straight line (the same stitch used for the hand puppet).
  • Demonstrate how to tie a knot on the underside of the felt once the fabric square is sewn on, then cut the thread and stick the needle back into the pincushion.
  • Remove the straight pins from the fabric and stick them back into the pincushion.
  • Pin and sew on the remaining three fabric squares on the other three corners of the felt rectangle, and tie knots on the underside of the felt after each square is sewn on. Use different colored thread for each square, thus giving students more practice threading the needle and tying knots.
  • Explain that this rectangle with four fabric squares sewn on it will be just one piece of the friendship quilt.
  • Bring a new felt rectangle from the shelf, this time choosing a different color.
  • Trace your hand on this felt rectangle, using a pencil or chalk, then using the scissors cut out the hand pattern.
  • Glue it in the center of the piece of the friendship quilt with tacky craft glue.
  • Write your name in fabric paint on the piece of the friendship quilt (see following image).
  • Place the friendship quilt piece in a safe place to allow the fabric paint to dry.
  • Encourage the students to make their own personal piece of the friendship quilt, as demonstrated.
  • Agree on a day by which everyone will have their pieces completed, so that the students can move to the next step in sewing a friendship quilt.
  • Remind the students to place all material back neatly on the tray when they are finished, and then to put the tray in its proper place on the shelf. Designate a storage area for all the completed pieces, and ask the students to place their pieces in this area.

PART 3: FINISHING THE FRIENDSHIP QUILT

  • Once the fabric paint is dry, invite the students to bring their pieces to the work area. Explain that all the completed pieces will be sewn together to make the friendship quilt.
  • Invite the students to lay their completed felt rectangles on the work area, so that they join like a patchwork quilt.
  • Demonstrate how to pin the rectangles together, then sew the rectangles together using an overcast or a zigzag stitch. Sew small sections of the quilt together at a time, or the quilt may become hard to manage. (It is recommended that the teacher pin and sew the quilt pieces together.)
  • Remind the students to clean the work area, place the material back on the tray, and return the tray to its proper place on the shelf when they are finished the activity.
  • When the quilt is finished, invite the students to display the quilt in a special place in the classroom for everyone to see.

About North American Montessori Teacher Training Center (NAMC)

  • Infant/Toddler (birth- 3 years)
  • Preschool/Kindergarten (3-6 years)
  • Lower Elementary (6-9 years)
  • Upper Elementary (9-12 years)

Flexible, Affordable, Manageable

Providing Montessori distance education training since 1996, NAMC is proud to have graduates working in Montessori environments throughout North America and around the world.

Beautiful, full color albums incorporate years of research to save valuable time as you attain professional Montessori training. Classic Montessori training is enriched with contemporary ideas and proven educational activities to give you lifetime teaching resources — all at a reasonable price, in a user-friendly presentation. For complete details visit http://www.montessoritraining.net

Receive additional lesson plans, craft ideas, recipes, and more by visiting

http://www.amonco.org/montessori_fall_handson.html

Leave a comment »

Christmas Coasters Tutorial

“I am SOOOOO behind on my Christmas sewing!! ARGH!!!!! I have so many things that I need to make!! I need a longer day, people.

After I dragged out my Christmas decorations I realized that I realllllly needed something for people to put their drinks on, water rings make me crazy. So I decided to whip up a couple of coasters and then I decided to add a mug rug.

This is so fast. I mean SUPER fast. Like 10 minutes for a few of them fast.

You can even use up scraps! Perfect!!!”  From Stacey Sews and Schools

Christmas+Coasters+Collage

Leave a comment »

Winter Crafting Ideas on Pinterest

Receive some additional winter crafting resources by visiting Winter Crafting Ideas on Pinterest

Enjoy!
Heidi Anne Spietz
www.amonco.org

Leave a comment »

Crafting the Winter Weekends Away

Brrrrr… . Now that we are in throes of winter, some families choose to spend the weekends snuggled in their warm homes reading their favorite book or finishing a craft project.    Why not make some lasting memories in the process?

Knitting, needlepoint, embroidery, crocheting, woodworking and other such activities serve multiple purposes and can be enjoyed by all. 

The benefits of crafting stretch far beyond just making memories.  First, young children receive practical life applications as well as learning how to combine colors and textures.  Second, crafting gives family members an opportunity to share a creative experience.   Third, we all know that you can’t put a price on the value of  handmade gift.  Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day are not far off, so, let’s examine some of the homemade gifts that can be used for these occasions.

 Knitting and Crocheting Resources 

 Whether you are a novice or a seasoned professional your first stop should be to the How to Knit and Crochet Learning Center http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/learn-home.html

You will find most of what is needed here – from the basics to a discussion forum where you can ask questions, look for project ideas and share the fun. You will also discover links to free projects.


scarf

Additional free knitting patterns are available at: http://crafts.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Free_Knitting_Patterns_for_Children  –

Bountiful Spinweave http://www.bountifulspinweave.com also offers fun and unique projects for children and teens.   Be sure to check out their beautiful selection of yarn for your knitting and crocheting projects, http://www.bountifulspinweave.com/yarns.php#.UPROneiR3UQand free patterns at Bountiful Spinweave Free Patterns http://www.bountifulspinweave.com/patterns.php#.UPROZ-iR3UQ

To see some of the crochet projects completed by the children at a Montessori school visit the Seattle Montessori Blog entries  Crochet! http://seattlemontessorian.blogspot.com/2009/10/crochet.html and French Knitting and Pom Poms http://www.howwemontessori.com/how-we-montessori/2012/04/french-knitting-and-pom-poms.html .

Since the price of yarn can be quite expensive, it’s always best to check the bins and discount tables at your local crafts or yardage store for bargains.  If it’s too cold to venture outside, visit Closeouts from Bountiful Spinweave http://www.bountifulspinweave.com

You can also find out more about fibers, books, spinning and weaving by visiting http://www.bountifulspinweave.com

 Needlepoint and Sewing Resources

 Have you admired those who create beautiful needlepoint masterpieces, but felt too timid to try to make one?  The sites below offer clear instructions for beginners and offer many interesting projects for children.

Visit Embroidery for Children – Save the Stitches http://www.nordicneedle.net/guides/stitching-techniques/embroidery-101/embroidery-for-children/ and How to Needlepoint http://www.needlepoint-for-fun.com/how-to-needlepoint.html

Receive a free Beginning Cross Stitch and Continental Stitch for Making Coasters by a visiting http://www.amonco.org/creative6/montessori_fall6.pdf   These coasters make a thoughtful gift for Valentine’s Day or Mother’s Day.

The Stacy Sews blog is filled with ideas that you and your children can do together this winter. Pont your browser to The Forty Minute Tote Bag http://www.purlbee.com/the-purl-bee/2012/6/3/mollys-sketchbook-the-forty-minute-tote.html and http://stacysewsandschools.wordpress.com/2012/07/23/christmas-in-july-a-book-cover-tutorial/Christmas in July – A Book Cover Tutorial. 

 Woodworking Resources

Woodworking projects take on a whole new meaning when older children and teens help out.    Most projects, at some point, must be finished outside, but there are a few on the lists below that can be completed indoors.

Here are sites to explore:

http://www.absolutelyfreeplans.com/PROJECTS%20FOR%20CHILDREN/projects_for_children.htm Projects for Children

 http://ezinearticles.com/?A-Basic-List-of-Hand-Tools-Needed-For-Kids-to-Get-Started-in-Woodworking&id=728003 A Basic List of Hand Tools Needed for Kids to Get Started in Woodworking

 http://www.thewoodbox.com/woodcrafts/box/bxbasicinfo.htm The Basic Wooden Box

 http://www.finewoodworking.com/woodworking-plans/article/kids-woodworking-projects.aspx Kid’s Woodworking Projects (For ages 7 and older)

All Art Supplies.com www.allartsupplies.com/ carries a wide range of art supplies for those interested in painting a design on their creation.

Nature’s Wokshop Plus!.com http://www.workshopplus.com/ offers the Wikki Stix Creativity Kit in which children can make wooden shapes, frames plus other interesting projects. 

Care and Concern Crafting

 For an activity that you can make for shut-ins,  please visit

https://montessori21stcentury.wordpress.com/2012/02/01/montessori-february-community-service-projects/

                                                       Community Service Projects

heart2013

 For more creative fun visit http://www.amonco.org/montessori_library.html and click on the free hands on lesson planning idea-planning newsletters.

Happy Crafting!

 Heidi Anne Spietz

American Montessori Consulting

http://www.amonco.org

Celebrating 25 Years of Serving School and Home Educators

Montessori for the 21st Century

Leave a comment »

March is National Crafts Month

It’s still cold in many areas throughout the United States. Some weekends are spent with families snuggled in their warm homes reading books, playing board games and doing other things to pass the time. Why not create some very special lasting memories?

Knitting, needlepoint, embroidery, crocheting and other such activities serve multiple purposes and can be enjoyed by all. It’s not too late to knit a scarf for that special someone. Mother’s Day and Father’s Day are not far away. Why not make a handmade gift that is created with thought and care?

You can readily see that the benefits stretch far beyond just making memories. First, young children receive practical life applications and learn how to combine colors and textures. Second, it gives family members an opportunity to share a creative experience. Third, we all know that you can’t put a price on a handmade gift.

So, let’s get started. First, visit How to Knit and Crochet You should find just about everything you need there – from the basics to a discussion forum where you can ask questions, look for project ideas and share the fun.

Find links to free projects, lesson planning ideas and other offerings by visiting Links

See http://www.amonco.org/creative3/montessori_fall3.pdf for more information.

Lois, from Bountiful, forwarded an easy to knit pattern that is perfect for beginners. Visit Broken Rib Scarf with Seed Stitch Border – EASY BEGINNER PATTERN to access this information.

Yarn can be expensive, so first check the bins and discount tables at your local crafts or yardage store for bargains. If it’s too cold to venture outside, visit Closeouts from Bountiful You can also found out more about fibers, books, spinning, weaving and some very special products by visiting Bountiful

Have you admired those who create beautiful needlepoint masterpieces, but have felt too timid to try this art yourself? Think again. Receive a good overview and directions on how to get started by visiting Teach a Child to Needlepoint and Needlepoint for Fun

Receive a Beginning Cross Stitch and Continental Stitch for Making Coasters by clicking here. To see more of Ruth’s beautiful designs visit Ruth Dilts Design

Harrisville Design’s pegLoom, is a great and affordable way to discover the excitement of real weaving. Children immediately grasp the technique of weaving with the simple, sturdy loom. Children can make wall hangings, purses, coasters, “mug rugs” and more! pegLoom includes everything needed for a complete woven project. The pegLoom was also the winner of the Teachers’ Choice Award. Visit Harrisville Designs

Next, point your browser to the Farm Country General Store http://www.homeschoolfcgs.com. This online store offers a wide variety of arts & crafts books and other resources for individual and group settings.

Be sure to also read the Creative Care March 2012 Newsletter for ready to use preschool age appropriate craft kits and other spring themed items. For additional information about year round crafts, please visit the Creative Care website.

For more creative fun visit Hands On Fun and click on the free hands on lesson planning idea planning newsletters.

Heidi Anne Spietz

Leave a comment »

The Thrill of Making and Flying Your Own Kites

One day, in June 2007, I took a stroll down Main Street in Seal Beach, California. After spending a relaxing day there, I decided to devote an article to helping you get the most out of your Seal Beach vacation experience. Yes, if you are planning to take a vacation to Southern California this summer, The Art and Science of Kite Flying article http://www.amonco.org, is a “must” read. Museums, art galleries, kite flying, hobby stores, eateries, and more are just a few of the things that await you in a town that has managed to keep its quaintness intact.

Please click here for 2010 information.

Enjoy 🙂

Heidi
Visit http://www.amonco.org today!
angel2.jpg
summer_01.gif
heart.jpg

Leave a comment »

Make Your Own Sock Doll

You can make some dolls out of socks. That’s right! See the pictures that accompany this post. First visit, AMC Scroll down until you see the info about the March, 2008 drawing. Click on the Sockdoll and Sockdoll1 hyperlinks. There, you will find concise instructions on how to make your own sock doll.
sockdolls1_press1.jpg

Topics include:

MAKING THE BODY OF THE DOLL
MAKING THE FACE OF THE DOLL
STUFFING TIPS
TIPS FOR BUYING THE MATERIALS
MAKING THE CLOTHES

This doll can be created for various purposes. The doll makes an interesting sensorial exercise, as children learn about combining colors and textures. Drawing, painting and sewing skills are also refined.

Make a vest and introduce practical lilfe lacing and buttoning presentations. Math applications include practice with fractions and estimating the cost of fabrics, socks, ribbons, etc.

Enjoy! 🙂

Heidi

Leave a comment »